Friday, 8 December 2017

My Christmas List!

I normally pop up my Christmas list on December 1st but since I was in Mexico, there's been a little delay! I really enjoy looking back at my old lists (2013, 2014, 2015 & 2016) and I love reading other peoples. It's so interesting to see the different things that different people want, and get ideas from them for what I'm going to get my friends and family.



I'm a big podcast person and some of my favourites have some really great merchandise. Like the My Favourite Murder 'Toxic Masculinity Ruins the Party Again' mug, an 'All Hail the Glow Cloud' pin from my favourite episode of Welcome to Night Vale, and a Vermilion Minotaur pin from Hello from the Magic Tavern. You can never have enough mugs or pins, right?

I tend to ask for a DVD box-set of Christmas of something that's older because they're generally not on Netflix and are super expensive to buy digitally, so over the years I've received absolute gems like FrasierMonk and Home Improvement. This year I have my eye on Golden Girls. A true classic!

I've never put books on my Christmas list while I've been book blogging because it would make for a very long list, but I was looking for a hardcover copy of Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K Jerome over Summer and found that The Folio Society has a truly beautiful copy. And I'm a sucker for having nice copies of my favourites.

This year is the year that I've started fostering kittens and while the charity I volunteer for is great at providing everything you need, I keep a list of things I think will make the kittens as comfortable as possible at a pretty traumatic time. Things like a Snuggle Kitty, a heating pad, various scratching toys, and plastic toys that keep them entertained while being easy to sanitize between litters. I also really want some new kittens to foster over the season to banish those holiday blues by feeling helpful so if Santa could hook me up, I'd love that.

What's on your Christmas list this year?

Monday, 27 November 2017

Four Years of Imogen's Typewriter.

I'm a little late on this because I'm currently in Mexico, but it was my blogs birthday a couple of days ago. 368 days have passed since I typed out Three Years of Imogen's Typewriter, 733 days since I wrote Two Years of Imogen's Typewriter, 1098 days since A Year of Imogen's Typewriter, and a whole 1463 days since I sat down and typed out my first post. Wild!



The past year has actually been a quiet year on the blog, as I've been writing about half the amount of posts that I usually write in a year. I've been busy and feeling a little lost. Though on the other hand, I'm prouder of the posts I'm actually hitting publish on. By putting less pressure to hit 2-3 posts a week, I've found myself able to really concentrate on good content like I predicted in my 2017 goals. Although I'd like to be able to hit a better balance in my fifth year.

I've been writing more in-depth reviews this year like; The White Road by Sarah LotzYesterday by Felicia YapThe Child by Fiona Barton, and so many half-drafts that I'm going to be finishing as soon as possible.

I've been replacing books I'm not going to read again like these and these with books I desperately wanted to buy- in fact, by following my 10 out, 1 in rule, I've only bought two books this year which has been a major change and helped me save for my current trip in Mexico!

I also started my second year of university which has been a big leap especially with the level of books I'm studying, I've suffered some big personal losses, I've been fostering kittens, I've been to France, CorfuNorway and now Mexico. And through it all, I've been blogging.

So thank you for reading and I'll see you in my next nostalgia-free post! 

Thursday, 9 November 2017

My Hallowreadathon Wrap-Up!

Another year, another Hallowreadathon over! It's always really lovely to see people getting their spooky reading on, and this year was no exception. It's hard for me to believe that this was my fourth year hosting my little readathon! Next year it'll be half a decade of spooks. But what about my reading, eh?

A pile of pumpkins next two two books: Poison City by Paul Crilley and Dracula by Bram Stoker


Poison City by Paul Crilley
As the readathon approached, I wasn't sure if I was going to pick up Poison City or Carrie by Stephen King from my TBR pile. But Poison City won out, mainly because I've read Carrie before and I find re-reads to be a little slower for me. I really enjoyed this, I didn't quite finish it but it's so much fun and I can't wait for the next book. It's a similar type of thing as the Ben Aaronovitch books I've dabbled with in the past, but the world feels more- real. I loved it, and it ended up having ghosts in at as well as a red cover!

Dracula by Bram Stoker
Oh boy. I don't know why I thought I could finish a 20-hour audiobook in 48 hours. Even on 1.25x speed, I didn't even get through half! But even a little Dracula was a relief to me, as I've not really been enjoying the gothic horror classics that I've been reading lately. Frankenstein? Didn't like it. My Jekyll and Dr Hyde? Hated it. Dracula? Loving it so far. Finally, an actual scare with a red cover.

So I didn't complete the challenge of finishing two books, but I'm still really happy with the reading I did and the spooks that came with it! If you want to see a more successful Hallowreadathon Wrap-up, check out Freya, who did great!

What did you read over Halloween? Have you read either of my picks?

Monday, 30 October 2017

Books I Read in September!

September was a good reading month! I feel like I hit a good balance of contemporary and classics, literary reads and genre, and I actually sailed through all of the books I 'read'-read with some cute foster kittens on my lap so that's always a win. So here's what I read and what I thought of them...



The Bone Collector by Jeffery Deaver
I've been wanting to re-read this series for a while. Well, years actually. But I've been actively thinking about it since last year, and I can tell because I took it to Northumberland and Munich!
The main character of this series is Lincoln Rhyme, a quadriplegic, and the disability representation in this book actually really impressed me. The research that Deaver put in shines through, and Rhyme isn't a cliché of a disabled person. There's no angelic patience, he's not there to teach an important lesson and he's not pitied- or at least, when he is, he finds it really annoying. In fact; "It infuriated him when people talked to him through others, through healthy people." Rhyme as a character feels real and it's one of the reasons this series stands out to me. If you, like me, like reading academically styled journals on current literature; here's a really interesting entry in the Disabled Studies Quarterly about this series that I found really interesting.
I love this book, I love the crime scene methods and the way the story unfolds so carefully. And I love that I am always surprised by the ending of this book, no matter how many times I read it. I always remember the ending wrong so I'm always remembering how I'm always surprised, as I'm surprised. It's just really clever.
Jeffery Deaver is one of my most owned authors and a lovely guy, and yet I hadn't read one of his books since last January! I'm so glad to be back on the bandwagon.


The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon by Stephen King
It was Stephen Kings birthday in September, and I was already currently-reading a fair amount of books so I picked up my shortest King on my shelves. I could get my fix, then go back to what I was reading. Plus, I'd never actually read The Girl who Loved Tom Gordon before! It was all a new experience, made even cuter with having a foster kitten on my lap.
I enjoy survival books. Give me a girl lost in a forest, a group in the apocalypse, a man lost at sea, I'm there. But I expect spooks from Stephen King. I was a third into the book before I had even a hint of a spook. The spooks were quality, don't get me wrong, they just came too late. Besides that, I did really enjoy it. It hit me right in that soft spot where she's nine, there's no GPS, nobody knows where she is and she's all alone trying to survive.
I'm not a baseball fan, so that part just flew right over my head as well. If you have at least a little knowledge of baseball and you don't mind a short book but a slow burn, you'll probably enjoy this a lot!
How could anyone have such a cold and scary voice inside them? Such a traitor to the cause?


Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Look at me, getting all ahead of my required reading for university! I wanted to like this book so much. Mary Shelley is so highly thought of, she wrote it at 19 and basically created a genre. And I like science fiction- but in reality, I just didn't enjoy Frankenstein. Hopefully, this changes once I study it but for now; I was dreadfully bored. The writing didn't really blow me away and all of the characters points of view were identical, but more than that, so little of the book was actually action. It was a lot of sitting around being melancholy, and especially in audiobook form, I fell asleep more than once.
Also, I really disagree with that ol' saying; "Knowledge is knowing that Frankenstein is not the monster. Wisdom is knowing that Frankenstein is the monster." For me, a monster is someone that goes around killing people. He's literally a serial killer; having killed three or more people, taking place longer than a month with a break in-between them. I don't know if that's knowledge or wisdom, but it doesn't make me sympathetic...
-for nothing contributes so much to tranquillise the mind as a steady purpose- a point on which the soul may fix its intellectual eye.


Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
I really didn't have a great time with classics this month! After adoring The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Brontë, I really wanted to go on and read another book by the sisters. And instead of starting Wuthering Heights like I probably should've since it's one of my required reads, I read Jane Eyre.
Jane Eyre and I don't get on, I'm afraid. I have a lot of thoughts that I'm collecting up in a different blog post, but as far as a review? Eh. I think I've been spoiled by The Tenant of Wildfell Hall because I don't find Jane as endearing, as feminist, or as good as other readers. For me, it reads more like a tale of a woman so mistreated in her youth that she ends up in an abusive relationship. I can't understand the love story aspect. And boy, when Jane tells Mr Rochester about her dreams, that's just boring.
I will say though, when Charlotte aims to spook, she spooks! Listening to the audiobook in the dead of night, I certainly had chills down my spine. I would've much prefered an all-out fearful tale, like the images of Cathy at the window in Wuthering Heights, or an all-out liberated woman like Helen in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. In the middle, Jane Eyre has my attention but not my affection.
"I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will, which I now exert to leave you."


Yuki Means Happiness by Alison Jean Lester*
I was first drawn to this book because of the unbelievably beautiful cover. And I wasn't sure what I expected. I don't read a lot of 'literary' type books so it was a new experience and one I enjoyed.
It feels very autobiographical for a story that isn't, written from a first-person perspective looking back at memories. Honest, brutal, it completely benefits from having a relatable main character in a unrelatable experience. Although I'm not sure the vague blurb really prepared me for a story that is, at its core, about sexual assault and the effects on the main character further on in her life. If I was searching for books about that, I wouldn't have found this. If I was avoiding books about that, I wouldn't have known. I was doing neither but it can be quite a tough read anyway.
The writing though. This is a fairly short book at under 300 pages, with a larger than average font. It's simplistic which makes it all the more powerful when it talks about such serious and complex topics. I sailed through it, and I'm going to have to return to this at a later date because I feel it could benefit from a second read when the character development, not the storyline, is my focus.
The nicest man in the world is still a man, and once you're taught that men are circling sharks, you're on the lookout for fins.


Have you read any of these? What did you think?

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