Friday, 28 June 2019

Fostering: Aurora!

Aurora came to me with almost no information and sometimes it happens that way; no big story of neglect or being found on the side of a busy road, just a cat that's been found as a stray or the owners have surrendered them for personal reasons. One day you have an empty room and the next, there's a big ball of fluffy ginger fur in your favourite chair.



I didn't bond that much with Aurora for a couple of reasons, and I get asked a lot about how I manage to say goodbye to my fosters so I thought I would mention some of the reasons that I don't bond with every cat and it can sometimes be really easy to send them off to a forever home.

The main reason is probably that I only had her for ten days. Sometimes I have cats for a long time, my longest being four months for a pregnant cat who had kittens, and sometimes they're snapped up the moment they're advertised. I don't know if it factored into her adoption specifically but the rarer a cat, the faster they seem to get adopted. Ginger females are outnumbered by ginger males about 1/4 because the ginger gene is on the X chromosome and females need two to be ginger. She's also long-haired, which a lot of people prefer despite the extra grooming. And she was cute as heck!

I joked on Twitter that I had never bonded with a long-haired female cat and that it was clearly the impact of 12 years of all-girls school but in reality, just like with humans, sometimes personalities don't click. This is why I always recommend meeting a cat before you adopt them if you can. Sometimes people end up leaving with a different cat then the one they originally came for!

The last thing is that the reason I started fostering was that I had a ginger cat, creatively named by 7-year old Imogen as Ginger, who passed away and I wanted to help. Seeing a ginger cat that wasn't my Ginger was jarring at times. Luckily, my area is overrun with black-and-white cats so I haven't had a ginger cat since!

Do you prefer long-hair or short-hair animals?

Saturday, 22 June 2019

Books I Read in November!

I'm going to catch up on these monthly wrap-up posts, I swear. Starting with November when half the books I read were co-written, which is an odd little coincidence! I really liked most of the books I got around to in November and even now, months later, really want to re-read at least two of them because of how much they impacted me. So!

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
I listened to the audiobook of this and it was so dang good even though I knew whodunnit (the BBC show was great too). I was genuinely spooked as it ramped up towards the end and the atmosphere was just so well-developed. The narrator, Hugh Fraser, does a lot of Agatha Christie audiobooks so I'm really looking forward to listening to some more when Autumn rolls around, which is really the perfect Christie season.


Magisterium: The Bronze Key by Holly Black and Cassandra Clare
I agree with my initial review on my re-read of this! Although I did rate it slightly lower; four stars rather than five, as I find that ramped up cliffhangers tend to make me rate books slightly higher the first time around. Plus, with the reading one right after the other, I found a continuity error and that is the kind of stuff that bothers my nitpicky soul when it comes to entertainment.


Magisterium: The Silver Mask by Holly Black and Cassandra Clare
I posted my full review of this just a few weeks ago here!
Sometimes he forgot how small she was because her bravery loomed so large in his mind.


Magisterium: The Golden Tower by Holly Black and Cassandra Clare
Unsurprisingly, I loved the final book in this series and it even had me laugh out loud at some points. Everything was tied up and rounded out well, it's what you hope for in a final book really.
My main problem with the series and this book, in particular, is just how rushed it all feels. On one hand; they're both pretty busy authors, Holly Black has her new series and Cassandra Clare seems to have a couple series on the go. And the Magisterium series didn't get much attention after the first book had its week on YouTube. On the other hand, I just wish they had taken their time with it a bit more. I gave books two to five, four stars and I genuinely think they could've all been as good as the first book with just a little more fleshing out.
I do hope Holly Black and Cassandra Clare work together again in the future. I'd love a companion series set in this world that delved into the European mages and their hatred of Chaos magic.


Persuasion by Jane Austen
Literally everyone I spoke to when I was starting to read Austen's works said that this was their favourite, even my mother who has pretty great taste. But it was my least favourite of the five I've read so far. I just didn’t connect with these characters at all and it really lacked some of the playfulness that her other works have. Maybe I'll re-read it in a few years and my opinions will change but I'd much rather dive into Sense & Sensibility again.


Autoboyography by Christina Lauren
Fun fact about me: Ebooks trigger my migraines so I mainly borrow them from the library as a way of deciding if I want to buy a physical copy. I also don't read very fast. I dip into books in short bursts rather than long stretches. I read this book in ebook form, in one night. And ended up buying a physical copy too.
I'll be doing a full review of this one because it blew my mind.


Christmas with the East End Angels by Rosie Hendry*
You can read my full review here!


Heartstopper: Volume 1 by Alice Oseman
I really like the Heartstopper comic, I read it online and decided to back it on Kickstarter and now it's traditionally published! It's adorable but, maybe because I read a lot of comics, I just don't think the art translates well in print.


An Easy Death by Charlaine Harris
I love Charlaine Harris but alternate history Wild West stories might not be the genre for me. The main vibe of the book that has stayed with me is an uncomfortable relationship with sex throughout. You've got an older male character 'waiting' until a female character is old enough to sleep with, and while there is an openness about sex work, the term 'whore' is thrown about. I guess because of the time? I'll still probably read the next book. I can't just not read a Charlaine Harris.
"-I stood looking up, seeing the vastness above me, nothing between me and the hereafter. I had my place, standing here on this dirt."


Have you read any of these? What did you think?

Tuesday, 4 June 2019

Book Review: Jane Seymour: The Haunted Queen by Alison Weir!

There are a few series which I never stop talking about; this is one of them! I loved book one, impatiently waited for book two, loved book two, impatiently waited for book three and took it on holiday where I read it in three days. You know I love a series where there's a paper trail on my blog that I can link you through!



Ever since she was a child, Jane has longed for a cloistered life as a nun. But her large noble family has other plans, and, as an adult, Jane is invited to the King’s court to serve as lady-in-waiting for Queen Katherine of Aragon. The devout Katherine shows kindness to all her ladies, almost like a second mother, which makes rumours of Henry’s lustful pursuit of Anne Boleyn—who is also lady-in-waiting to the queen—all the more shocking. For Jane, the betrayal triggers memories of a painful incident that shaped her beliefs about marriage.

But once Henry disavows Katherine and secures his new queen—altering the religious landscape of England—he turns his eye to another: Jane herself. Urged to return the King’s affection and earn favour for her family, Jane is drawn into a dangerous political game that pits her conscience against her desires. Can Jane be the one to give the King his long-sought-after son or will she meet a fate similar to the women who came before her?


I have to start by saying... Jane Seymour: The Haunted Queen* was my least favourite book so far. I only rated it... four stars. Shocking, I know! I've loved this series so much that this was a surprise to me, even though I still really enjoyed it. I guess not everyone can be a Katherine of Aragon or an Anne Boleyn. Jane may have been Henry's favourite but she isn't mine.

It's just that Jane as a character is just a little bit boring. The book doesn't reflect this because it's really interesting but as a character... Everything happens to her, which, yeah, she was a woman in the 1500s but rarely is a decision made that she actually sticks to. Then she'll blame someone else. And her relationship with the King! She literally says at one point that "no sane woman would want to entangle herself with such a man" but goes on to talk about his vulnerability. She's that friend you have that keeps going back to her ex even when he's clearly a terrible person.

Reflecting, I'm not a huge fan of the choice to add the supernatural aspect of ghosts to the story. It was interesting, but it strays a little too far into the fictional side of historical fiction. It's my pet peeve in science-based crime-dramas on TV when they do this and it's always such a jump-the-shark moment for me, especially since there's no historical base for it. If she had written a letter mentioning a ghost, sure, but as you can tell from the title, this Haunted Queen kind of overshadows the actual person.

As always though, Alison Weirs Author's Note is truly fascinating as she goes into her method of writing historical fiction; her sources and choices. It makes me wish more authors would go into their thought processes and writing methods, it's fascinating. I really have to pick up one of her non-fiction books these days.

Have you started this series yet? What do you think?

*I was sent a proof copy of this book. I bought the hardcover myself.

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